Lectures on Justice, Revenue & Arms by Adam Smith

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Lectures on Justice, Revenue & Arms by Adam Smith

800.00

LECTURES ON JUSTICE, POLICE, REVENUE AND ARMS. DELIVERED IN THE UNIVERSITY OF GLASGOW. BY ADAM SMITH. REPORTED BY A STUDENT IN 1763 AND EDITED WITH AN INTRODUCTION AND NOTES. BY EDWIN CANNAN. Oxford: At the Clarendon Press, 1896. First Edition. Very Rare.

A solid and attractive exceedingly rare and important book, the first publication of these important and influential lectures of Adam Smith, which were to form the basis of "The Wealth of Nations". Many of the ideas that Smith went on to expound in his groundbreaking works appear here in their early forms. Edward Cannan was a young economist who went on to be highly influential at the LSE. In this book, Cannon offers an introduction and a table of parallel passages between the lectures and "Wealth of Nations". This book is solid and complete, without writing or markings in the text, and with the original black endpapers and the original publisher's red cloth binding. There is some fraying to the spinetips and corners, but the binding is solid and this book can be handled and read without fear of damage. Published 120 years ago, this First Edition book is now highly sought-after and hard-to-find: three other copies for sale on the internet are priced $1550, $1725 and $2060. This book should be as valuable. 

From a contemporary review of the book which appeared in International Journal of Ethics (April 1897): "These are a set of student's notes transcribed, in 1766, from an original of 1763. Their genuiness is well attested, and the internal evidence is all in their favor. The sentences have so characteristic a ring of the great author that we cannot fail to believe in the faithfulness of the original record. The programme of the course covered by these notes bears out the well-known description given by Millar in Dugald Stewart's 'Life of Adam Smith'. We may suppose it not impossible that the original notes were Millar's own. In any case the correspondence is exact. According to Millar, Adam Smith divided his course in Moral Philosophy into four parts, which we may sum up as (a) natural theology, (b) ethics, (c) justice (with natural jurisprudence), and (d) expediancy (with political economy and economic policy). The lectures on the first are lost. The Moral Sentiments, 1759, embraced the second, and the Wealth of Nations, 1776, presented Adam Smith's revised version of the fourth. The present notes give us the third, together with the first version of the fourth; and we are able in some degree to see how the philosopher passed from the one part to the other, and how systematic was his conception of what we should now call Social Philosophy. The main interest of this happy discovery is the light it throws on the Wealth of Nations. Mr Cannan points out the changes made after Adam Smith's acquaintance with the Physiocrats and their teachings. The editing has been done with care, judgment, and learning; and the book will be an indispensable aid to the thorough understanding of Adam Smith".

From the Preface: "THE history of the manuscript now made public and the principles which I have followed in editing it are fully dealt with in the Introduction. I have here only to express my gratitude to Mr. Thomas Raleigh, who, when I first took the work in hand, was REader in English LAw at Oxford and a Delegate of the University PRess, and is now Registrar to the Judicial Committee of the PRivy Council Besides reading through the text, and making observations on passages which he thought corrupt or in need of explanation, he has since answered from time to time, with unwearied patience, the inquiries I have addressed to him on legal points many of which must have appeared trivial to nay one except an editor desirous of believing himself to be conscientious. It must be understood, however, that, as he has had no opportunity of seeing what use I have made of the information derived from him, he is no more responsible for anything which actually occurs in the notes than Mr. Serjeant Hawkins or any other legal authority whom I have consulted Edwin Cannan. Oxford, August. 1896."

From the Text: "EDITOR'S INTRODUCTION. CHAPTER I. HISTORY OF THE REPORT. 'Of Mr. Smith's lectures while a professor at Glasgow, no part has been preserved, excepting what he himself published in the Theory of Moral Sentiments and in the Wealth of Nations.' tThis statement was made by Dugald Stewart in the 'Account of the Life and Writings of Adam Smith,' which he read before the Royal Society of Edinburgh early in 1793. He allowed it to be printed in the Transactions of the society in 1794, and to be reprinted both in 1795 and in 1811 without alteration. For a little more than a century it has remained unquestioned, and, so far as Adam Smith's own lecture-notes are concerned, it is doubtless correct. When setting out for London in April, 1773, Adam Smith wrote a letter to Hume, whom he had made his literary executor, giving instructions as to the disposal of his papers in case of his death. Except those which he carried along with him, that is to say, the manuscript of the Wealth of nations, there were none, he said, worth publication, unless perhaps the fragment on the history of astronomical systems, to be found in a certain desk, might be printed as a portion 'of an intended juvenile work.' 'All of the other loose papers which you will find in that desk,' the letter continues, 'or within the glass folding doors of a bureau which stands in my bedroom, together with about eighteen thin folio paper books which you will likewise find within the same glass folding doors, I desire may be destroyed without any examination.'..."

Contents include: Many do not labour at all; Proportion of workers dependent on amount of stock; Pin-making; Difficulty of dividing labour in agriculture; What Gives occasion tot he division of labour; Banking; Mississippi scheme; Money compared to a highway; Idleness in a capital towns; Loans really consist of goods, not money; Slave cultivation esp. in West Indies and America; Slavery not likely to be labolished where slaves are numerous; Papal influence in favour of emancipation; Metayer or steel-bow tenants; Forty-shilling freeholders; Feudal imposts on traders; borough Farms; King uses Commons against Lords; Freedom of a villain escaping to a borough; Warwick the King-maker's hospitality; No sovereign nor commonwealth in a nation of hunters; Progress of military service; Rent as the sole source of public revenue; Effect of the introduction of luxury on the kingly power; The nationl debt; Loans are advanced by merchants; Amount of the national debt; 

According to wikipedia: "Lectures on Jurisprudence, also called Lectures on Justice, Police, Revenue and Arms (1763) is a collection of Adam Smith's lectures, comprising notes taken from his early lectures. It contains the formative ideas behind the The Wealth of Nations. Published as part of the 1976 Glasgow Edition of the works and correspondence of Adam Smith. It consists of two sets of lecture notes that were apparently taken from Smith's lectures of the 1760s, along with an 'Early Draft' of The Wealth of Nations. The same material had also appeared as An Early Draft of Part of The Wealth of Nations and as Lectures on Justice, Police, Revenue and Arms.Smith’s Lectures on Jurisprudence, originally delivered at the University of Glasgow in 1762–1763, present his ‘theory of the rules by which civil government ought to be directed.’ The chief purpose of government, according to Smith, is to preserve justice; and ‘the object of justice is security from injury.’ The state must protect the individual’s right to his person, property, reputation, and social relations..."

According to Wikipedia: "Adam Smith FRSA (16 June 1723 NS (5 June 1723 OS) – 17 July 1790) was a Scottish moral philosopher, pioneer of political economy, and a key figure in the Scottish Enlightenment.[2] He is best known for two classic works: The Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759), and An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (1776). The latter, usually abbreviated as The Wealth of Nations, is considered his magnum opus and the first modern work of economics.[3] Smith studied social philosophy at the University of Glasgow and at Balliol College, Oxford, where he was one of the first students to benefit from scholarships set up by fellow Scot, John Snell. After graduating, he delivered a successful series of public lectures at Edinburgh, leading him to collaborate with David Hume during the Scottish Enlightenment. Smith obtained a professorship at Glasgow teaching moral philosophy, and during this time he wrote and published The Theory of Moral Sentiments. In his later life, he took a tutoring position that allowed him to travel throughout Europe, where he met other intellectual leaders of his day. Smith laid the foundations of classical free market economic theory. The Wealth of Nations was a precursor to the modern academic discipline of economics. In this and other works, he developed the concept of division of labour, and expounded upon how rational self-interest and competition can lead to economic prosperity. Smith was controversial in his own day and his general approach and writing style were often satirised by Tory writers in the moralising tradition of William Hogarth and Jonathan Swift. In 2005, The Wealth of Nations was named among the 100 Best Scottish Books of all time.[4] The minor planet 12838 Adamsmith was named in his memory.[5]..."

Also according to Wikipedia: "Edwin Cannan (3 February 1861, Funchal, Madeira – 8 April 1935, Bournemouth), the son of artist Jane Cannan, was a British economist and historian of economic thought. He was a professor at the London School of Economics from 1895 to 1926. As a partisan of Jevonianism, Edwin Cannan is perhaps best known for his logical dissection and destruction of Classical theory in his famous 1898 tract History of the Theories of Production and Distribution. Although Cannan had personal and professional difficulties with Alfred Marshall, he was still "Marshall's man" at the LSE from 1895 to 1926. During that time, particularly during his long stretch as chairman after 1907, Edwin Cannan shepherded the LSE away from its roots in Fabian socialism into tentative Marshallianism. This period was only to last, however, until his protégé, Lionel Robbins, took over with his more "Continental" ideas. Though Cannan, in his early years as an economist, was a critic of classical economics and an ally of interventionists, he moved sharply to the side of classical liberalism in the early 20th century. He favored a simplicity, clarity, and common sense in the exposition of economics.[1] According to Geoffrey M. Hodgson, Cannan "emphasised the institutional foundation of economic systems...."
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Octavo - sized hardcover book; xxxix + 293 pages of text. Very Good- condition: no writing or markings in the text; light cracking in gutters of first couple of pages; no other torn or missing pages; untrimmed page edges; no ownership markings; original black endpapers, with some repaired cracking to hinges' book is solidly bound and hinges are firm. Original hardcover binding, with wear, light stain to front board, some rippling to rear board, tearing to spine tips, and fraying to corners. A solid and attractive copy of this exceedingly rare book.

Please look through my other auction listings- I have listed many scarce and unusual books this week on ebay. Please bid on more than one book, because I will be happy to reduce shipping costs for multiple purchases; media mail postage is $4 for this listing, and $1 for each additional book that you win from me. International bids welcomed, international airmail postage $28; Canadian airmail postage $20.

bruce

 

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